Class of ’24 Climbs to New Heights at Refreshing Mountain

By Julia B. ’24
Photos by Ms. Kenny

Team building can be a difficult task, especially in Middle School. The seventh grade accepted that challenge on its trip last week to Refreshing Mountain Retreat and Adventure Center. Fears were faced when flying down ziplines, and bonds were made around a fun-filled campfire. The main goal of the trip was to connect the class as a whole, and we came out of the trip stronger as a group.

P1020471
IMG_6272
P1020462
P1020454
P1020453
P1020451
P1020442
P1020438
P1020431
P1020427
P1020418
P1020402
P1020397
P1020396
P1020390
P1020389
P1020422
P1020387
P1020420
P1020386
P1020384
P1020380
P1020377
P1020373
P1020371
P1020350
P1020347
P1020343
P1020339
P1020335
IMG-6190
P1020310
P1020312
P1020301
P1020306
IMG-6178
P1020293

One of the most difficult things for many people was the giant swing. It is called the giant swing because you are harnessed to a rope and the entire team pulls you up to the top of a pole. You then pull a cord and swing back and forth until lowered back to the ground. A lot of my classmates were very uneasy about it, including myself, but others put forth encouragement to give nearly everyone enough confidence to do the activity. One of the craziest things about the swing is you have to do it yourself. Once you get all the way up, there is no way down other than to pull the tiny orange cord that will cause you to fall backward. You need to have faith in yourself and in the knowledge that you’ll be safe.

While being fun, lots of these activities taught us values that we will keep with us forever. We learned the most from the team-building activities. Many of these revolved around listening to each other to solve puzzles. Our group quickly found this was not easy because we all have such different personalities. Therefore, these activities also taught us more about ourselves. We saw who fit into a leadership position and who would follow along. It took patience, perseverance and logic to get it done, but we all found the answer to each puzzle. We found that sometimes all it takes is communication between one another or just simple manners. If our grade had not taken this adventure together, we would not be as close as we are now.

The zipline was the highlight of the trip. Lots of our group had been ziplining before. For me, it was a new experience. I have always been scared of heights, but for this trip I decided, along with many of my classmates, to get over that fear. My class pushed me to make the decision to go, and for that I am thankful. Over the three days, we changed a great deal. I saw the side of my classmates that showed support for each other. It was truly a special thing to behold.

As I went down the zipline, I could hear the group cheering me on. I felt like I could do anything, just because of that reliance I knew I could place on my classmates.

The Class of 2024 went into the trip as classmates, but we came out a connected group of friends. We never realized that racing each other in go-karts and freezing while waiting to take our turn on activities was bringing us closer.

The seventh grade needed a trip like Refreshing Mountain to challenge us. Even though we learned many things on the trip, the most important discovery we made was that that we could rely on each other.

Halloween Slideshow

Photos by: Mrs. Haddad, Mrs. Grim, Arielle B. ’21, Carly C. ’19, Mason L. ’19, Tommy C. ’21

Seniors and kindergarteners, superheroes and their archenemies walking in peaceful solidarity, classroom jack-o’-lanterns and hay rides. All of this could only add up to one adorable thing: Halloween at Country Day. Boo.

MS_L4250
MS_L4244
MS_L4239
IMG_2185
IMG_4456
IMG_4340
IMG_5989
IMG_4352
Halloween1-6_1
IMG_4358
IMG_4339
IMG_4363
IMG_4393
Halloween1-12_1
Halloween1-17_1
IMG_1110
Halloween Parade-12
Halloween Parade-13
Halloween Parade-14
Halloween Parade-15
Halloween Parade-16
Halloween Parade-17
Halloween Parade-18
Halloween Parade-19
Halloween Parade-20
Halloween Parade-21
Halloween Parade-22
Halloween Parade-23
Halloween Parade-25
Halloween Parade-26
Halloween Parade-28
HalloweenFest2018_08
HalloweenFest2018_10
HalloweenFest2018_13
HalloweenFest2018_14
HalloweenFest2018_18
HalloweenFest2018_22
HalloweenFest2018_25
HalloweenFest2018_24
HalloweenFest2018_30
HalloweenFest2018_32
HalloweenFest2018_33
HalloweenFest2018_36
HalloweenFest2018_46
HalloweenFest2018_58
HalloweenFest2018_67
HalloweenFest2018_72
DSC_3263_1
DSC_3290_1
DSC_3330_1
halloween fest-2_1

Making the Audience Squirm, but ‘Funny Squirming’

“I love him,” Wolanin swooned. “In undergrad I first fell in love with him and I saw ‘The Imaginary Invalid’ and ‘The Misanthrope’ and, of course, ‘Tartuffe.’ ‘Tartuffe’ is my favorite. It’s just…”

With that, Director Kristin Wolanin trailed off in smiling reverie. The “him” she fell in love with is Molière, one of the French language’s greatest playwrights, whose comedies have remained popular since the 17th century and continue to grace stages around the world.

The curtain will rise on the Lancaster Country Day theater troupe’s production of “Tartuffe” at 7 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, Nov. 1-3, with a 2 p.m. matinee Saturday, Nov. 3. Advance tickets are $7 and available here. They will be $10 at the door.

004
006
012
013
014
036
052
051
045
025
016

Written in 1664, “Tartuffe” has left a lasting impression on both French and English, with the name of its main character entering the lexicon as a byword for a religious hypocrite or someone who puts on ostentatiously virtuous airs.

“Tartuffe is a piece of work,” Wolanin said, going easy on the play’s titular pious fraud, who cons and swindles and attempts to corrupt every other character in the play. “He’s selling salvation and the rest of the characters so blindly believe that this guy is their salvation. Until they’re forced to learn otherwise.”

In bringing to life a story written in another language more than three and a half centuries ago, the cast faced a daunting challenge, but the main difficulty came neither from the translation nor cultural distance. What makes “Tartuffe” particularly tricky to perform in a naturalistic way is that the entire play is composed in rhyming couplets.

“Getting the rhythm of the dialogue right has been probably the hardest part for everybody, but when they get there and it just flows and they’re comfortable with it, it’s beautiful,” said Wolanin. “I love that it was written in 1664 and still feels timely. And timeless.”

One thing that’s not timeless is fashion, but for this production, Wolanin opted to be true to the period, decking the cast in full Louis XIV-era regalia. To help get the look right, the school partnered with Millersville University for its costumes, which don’t skimp on the powdery wigs or frilly frocks.

A skill that was vital for the actors to master, and that will be just as important for the audience, is listening closely. While someone in the course of regular talking could speak in iambic pentameter without it sounding stilted, the odds of that person communicating in extemporaneous rhyming couplets are decidedly slimmer.

But Wolanin promises that the audience’s close listening will be rewarded.

“I want people to come away thinking about whether they’re being Tartuffed somehow,” Wolanin said. “It might make people squirm. But funny squirming.”

“Tartuffe,” 7 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, Nov. 1-3, with a 2 p.m. matinee Saturday, Nov. 3. Advance tickets are $7 and available here. They will be $10 at the door.


“Tartuffe” Cast & Crew

Cast:

Orgon — David W.
Elmire — Kendall K.
Damis — Laurel M.
Mariane — May B.
Madame Pernelle — Mira H.
Valere — Hayden F.
Cleante — Ben K.
Tartuffe — Thomas W.
Dorine — Adrien W.
Flipote — Amelia L.
The Officer of the King — Tess M.
M. Loyal — Frannie T.

Crew:

Production Stage Manager — Malia C.
Assistant Stage Managers — Kylie D. and Joan M.
Sound Designers — Grace F. and Piper S.
Sound Run — Piper S.
Props Mistress and Run — Gaby N.
Props Crew — Mira H., Tess M., Maya R. and Linnea W.
Props Run — Linnea W.
Lead Set Design — Carly C.
Set Crew/Stage Crew — Julia B., Riyley E., Amelia L., Piper S., Adrien W. and Linnea W.
Publicity Chief — Charley W.
Costume Mistress and Run — Katrina F.
Costume Crew — Julia B., Sam L., Sarah H., Amelia L., Christopher M., Julia N., Sadi S., Frannie T. and Adrien W.
Costume Run — Amelia L., Christopher M., Julia N. and Sadi S.
Master Electrician and Run — Justin K.
Box Office Manager and Run — Amelia S.
Box Office Assistant and Run — Sophie M.
House Manager and Run — Maya R.
Ushers — Julia B., Carly C., Riley E., Sam L., Grace F. and Sarah H.

Fall Sports Slideshow and Wrap-Up

As the fall sports season comes toward the finish line, five varsity teams have secured berths in the postseason, whether in League or District play, and two others could achieve the same with a strong finish to the regular season and some helpful losses from their League competitors. Below is a thorough team-by-team summary compiled by Director of Athletics Zac Kraft.

Live Golf!-12
Live Golf!-6
Live Golf!-3
307__DSC3297
280__DSC3197
275__DSC3178
266__DSC3147
259__DSC3102
247__DSC3067
235__DSC3025
133__DSC2941
123_DSC5682
039_DSC5322
034_DSC5303
028_DSC5290
019_DSC5263
011_DSC5230
001_DSC5198
180_DSC5930
157_DSC5817
149_DSC5787
098_DSC5591
085_DSC5546
081_DSC5533
125_DSC5687
110__DSC3028
077__DSC2911
065__DSC2875
045__DSC2832
036__DSC2814
031__DSC2798
018__DSA4006
099__DSC3964
057__DSC3943
055__DSC3937
051__DSC2589
041__DSC2529
034__DSC2482
025__DSC2431
419__DSC4313
405__DSC3643
370__DSC3520
358__DSC3446
357__DSC3443
346__DSC4281
332__DSC3376

The Girls’ Tennis team ended the regular season with an overall record of 10-1, 5-1 in L-L League Section 4 (second place). The Cougars lost to Lampeter Strasburg in the first round of the L-L League Team Tournament. The Cougars (No. 4 Seed) qualified for the District III Team Tournament and will face Delone Catholic (No. 5 Seed) in the first round today. Individually, Cassidy G. ’21 placed fourth in the L-L League 2A Singles Tournament, and, along with Kendall K. ’19, qualified for the District III Singles Tournament which will begin Friday at Hershey Racquet Club.

The Golf team finished the regular season with an overall record of 22-8, 19-6 in L-L League Section 3 (second place). Matt B. ’19 and Nick H. ’19 finished second and third, respectively, in Section 3 scoring average. At the L-L League Individual Championships at Conestoga Country Club Sept. 24, Matt (t-ninth) Nick (t-15th) and Phoebe S. ’22 (11th) earned medals and qualified for the PIAA District III Championships at Briarwood Golf Club. Nick placed fourth (+11 over two days), Berkenstock 10th (+18) in the 2A Boys and Stover placed fifth in the 2A girls. Nick and Phoebe advanced to the PIAA Regional Qualifier Monday, Oct. 15 at Golden Oaks Golf Club in Berks County.

The Girls’ Soccer team is currently 7-8 overall, 4-8 in L-L League Section 4 (fifth place) with two non-league games remaining on the schedule. The Cougars will miss out on the L-L League Playoffs, but have quailed for the PIAA District III Single A Tournament which will begin Monday, October 22.

The Boys’ Soccer team finished the regular season 12-4-1 overall, 9-3 in L-L League Section 4 (third place). The Cougars will miss out on the L-L League Playoffs, but have qualified for the PIAA District III Single A Tournament, and will host a Quarterfinal Round game Wednesday, Oct. 24.

The Field Hockey team is currently 10-6-1 overall, 9-5-1 in L-L League Section 3 (fifth place). The Cougars will miss out on the L-L League Playoffs, and must win their regular season finale at home vs. ELCO on Friday to have a chance at qualifying for the PIAA District III Single A Tournament.

The McCaskey Boys’ and Girls’ Cross Country teams finished the regular season 7-3 and 5-5, respectively, and will now begin preparations for the L-L League Championships Tuesday, Oct. 16 at Ephrata Middle School, District III Championships Oct. 27 at Big Spring High School and PIAA State Championships Nov. 3 in Hershey. Arielle B. ’21 is ranked among the top female runners in the League.

The LCHS Girls’ Volleyball Team is currently 9-5 overall, 6-3 in L-L League Section 3 (third place) with three matches remaining. With a strong finish, the Crusaders could qualify for the L-L League and PIAA District III playoffs.

Spirit Week & TACO in Photographs

Experience the story of Spirit Week through the lenses of Cougar News Photography Interns Hayden F. ’20, Arielle B. ’21, and seniors Carly C. and Mason L. Their teacher, Donna Wilcox, was a fellow visual raconteur, chronicling Take A Child Outside Week. We would also like to thank Dr. Trout, Mrs. Trout and Mr. Lisk for contributing photos. Finally, we doff our hats to the senior class, who did primary colors proud by wearing red to victory in Color Wars 2018.

ColorWars2018(Hayden)013
ColorWars2018(Hayden)014
ColorWars2018(Hayden)026
ColorWars2018(Hayden)038
ColorWars2018(Hayden)045
ColorWars2018(Hayden)062
IMG_2115
IMG_2114
ColorWars2018(Hayden)015
ColorWars2018(Hayden)035
ColorWars2018(Hayden)036
IMG_0115
IMG_0139
IMG_0145
IMG_0161
IMG_0175
TACO — Donna1
TACO — Donna2
TACO — Donna4
TACO — Donna5
TACO — Donna3
TACO — Donna6
ColorWars2018(Hayden)071
ColorWars2018(Hayden)077
ColorWars2018(Hayden)101
ColorWars2018(Hayden)104
SpiritWeek — Carly6
Spirit — Schwartz1
SpiritWeek — Carly1
SpiritWeek2018_081
SpiritWeek — Carly2
SpiritWeek2018_104
SpiritWeek — Carly4
SpiritWeek — Carly5
_1SL8661
_1SL8682
IMG_3333
_1SL8725
SpiritWeek — Carly3
_1SL8728
IMG_3940
Spirit — Schwartz6
IMG_3951
SpiritWeek — Carly13
Spirit — Schwartz4
Spirit — Schwartz5
Spirit — Schwartz9
ColorWars2018(Hayden)111
Spirit — Arielle2
Spirit — Arielle3
Spirit — Arielle4
_1SL8745
SpiritWeek — Carly9
SpiritWeek — Carly10
SpiritWeek2018_126
SpiritWeek — Carly11
SpiritWeek — Carly12
SpiritWeek — Donna1
SpiritWeek — Donna5
SpiritWeek — Donna2
SpiritWeek — Donna3
SpiritWeek — Donna4
SpiritWeek2018_140
SpiritWeek2018_142
SpiritWeek2018_144
SpiritWeek2018_152
SpiritWeek2018_151
SpiritWeek2018_179
SpiritWeek — Carly17
SpiritWeek2018_178
SpiritWeek — Carly14
SpiritWeek2018_185
SpiritWeek — Carly18
raceforhome — Mason