Fall Sports Slideshow and Wrap-Up

As the fall sports season comes toward the finish line, five varsity teams have secured berths in the postseason, whether in League or District play, and two others could achieve the same with a strong finish to the regular season and some helpful losses from their League competitors. Below is a thorough team-by-team summary compiled by Director of Athletics Zac Kraft.

Live Golf!-12
Live Golf!-6
Live Golf!-3
307__DSC3297
280__DSC3197
275__DSC3178
266__DSC3147
259__DSC3102
247__DSC3067
235__DSC3025
133__DSC2941
123_DSC5682
039_DSC5322
034_DSC5303
028_DSC5290
019_DSC5263
011_DSC5230
001_DSC5198
180_DSC5930
157_DSC5817
149_DSC5787
098_DSC5591
085_DSC5546
081_DSC5533
125_DSC5687
110__DSC3028
077__DSC2911
065__DSC2875
045__DSC2832
036__DSC2814
031__DSC2798
018__DSA4006
099__DSC3964
057__DSC3943
055__DSC3937
051__DSC2589
041__DSC2529
034__DSC2482
025__DSC2431
419__DSC4313
405__DSC3643
370__DSC3520
358__DSC3446
357__DSC3443
346__DSC4281
332__DSC3376

The Girls’ Tennis team ended the regular season with an overall record of 10-1, 5-1 in L-L League Section 4 (second place). The Cougars lost to Lampeter Strasburg in the first round of the L-L League Team Tournament. The Cougars (No. 4 Seed) qualified for the District III Team Tournament and will face Delone Catholic (No. 5 Seed) in the first round today. Individually, Cassidy G. ’21 placed fourth in the L-L League 2A Singles Tournament, and, along with Kendall K. ’19, qualified for the District III Singles Tournament which will begin Friday at Hershey Racquet Club.

The Golf team finished the regular season with an overall record of 22-8, 19-6 in L-L League Section 3 (second place). Matt B. ’19 and Nick H. ’19 finished second and third, respectively, in Section 3 scoring average. At the L-L League Individual Championships at Conestoga Country Club Sept. 24, Matt (t-ninth) Nick (t-15th) and Phoebe S. ’22 (11th) earned medals and qualified for the PIAA District III Championships at Briarwood Golf Club. Nick placed fourth (+11 over two days), Berkenstock 10th (+18) in the 2A Boys and Stover placed fifth in the 2A girls. Nick and Phoebe advanced to the PIAA Regional Qualifier Monday, Oct. 15 at Golden Oaks Golf Club in Berks County.

The Girls’ Soccer team is currently 7-8 overall, 4-8 in L-L League Section 4 (fifth place) with two non-league games remaining on the schedule. The Cougars will miss out on the L-L League Playoffs, but have quailed for the PIAA District III Single A Tournament which will begin Monday, October 22.

The Boys’ Soccer team finished the regular season 12-4-1 overall, 9-3 in L-L League Section 4 (third place). The Cougars will miss out on the L-L League Playoffs, but have qualified for the PIAA District III Single A Tournament, and will host a Quarterfinal Round game Wednesday, Oct. 24.

The Field Hockey team is currently 10-6-1 overall, 9-5-1 in L-L League Section 3 (fifth place). The Cougars will miss out on the L-L League Playoffs, and must win their regular season finale at home vs. ELCO on Friday to have a chance at qualifying for the PIAA District III Single A Tournament.

The McCaskey Boys’ and Girls’ Cross Country teams finished the regular season 7-3 and 5-5, respectively, and will now begin preparations for the L-L League Championships Tuesday, Oct. 16 at Ephrata Middle School, District III Championships Oct. 27 at Big Spring High School and PIAA State Championships Nov. 3 in Hershey. Arielle B. ’21 is ranked among the top female runners in the League.

The LCHS Girls’ Volleyball Team is currently 9-5 overall, 6-3 in L-L League Section 3 (third place) with three matches remaining. With a strong finish, the Crusaders could qualify for the L-L League and PIAA District III playoffs.

Spring Sports Slideshow

By Athletic Director Austen Hannis

All three varsity programs are poised to play in the PIAA District III playoff​s.​ In addition to the tennis team earning a team playoff berth, Jonah ​R.’20 and ​ George M​.’19​ have earned bids to the singles tournament while Herbert ​B.​’18 and Carter A​.’18 will compete in the doubles tournamen​t.​ Girls Lacrosse has earned a place in the Lancaster-Lebanon League playoffs after completing a regular season league record of 9-2​. ​Nick A​.’18 competed at Penn Relays as he anchored the 4 x 100 meter relay team from J​.​P. McCaskey​ and Boys Lacrosse remains in contention for a Lancaster-Lebanon League Playoff spot after beating Warwick for the first time in 12 years.

Peak Action Photography
Peak Action Photography
Peak Action Photography
262_DSA7600
268_DSA7620
286_DSA7692
292_DSA7707
302_DSA7749
306_DSA7756
4/11/18, Lancaster, Lancaster Country Day,  ...
4/11/18, Lancaster, Lancaster Country Day,  ...
4/11/18, Lancaster, Lancaster Country Day,  ...
4/11/18, Lancaster, Lancaster Country Day,  ...
4/11/18, Lancaster, Lancaster Country Day,  ...
111_DSB1865
135_DSB1933
IMG_4838
IMG_4840
IMG_4847
IMG_4850
329_DSA7832 2
401_DSA8082
405_DSA8097
427_DSA8161
503_DSA8413 2
574_DSA8647
641_DSB2177
Lancaster Country Day School  V Boys Lax4-23-18
Lancaster Country Day School  V Boys Lax4-23-18
Lancaster Country Day School  V Boys Lax4-23-18
Lancaster Country Day School  V Boys Lax4-23-18
Lancaster Country Day School  V Boys Lax4-23-18
IMG_4854
IMG_4857
IMG_4859
IMG_4864
IMG_4875
IMG_4876

Winter Sports Slideshow

The LCDS boys and girls varsity basketball squads have hit the hardwood running this year! Both teams have competed well, already notching double-digit wins with a third of the season still to play. Both squads are in prime position for a postseason run. The boys and girls squash teams have reveled in having our new home courts, which have already hosted several matches against visiting schools. Right now, both the boys and girls squads are focused on preparing for the U.S. High School Team Squash Championships, which begin next Friday in Philadelphia.

0039_DSB7666
0284_DSB8056
0210_DSA4758
0193_DSB7906
0119_DSA4625
0104_DSB7803
0089_DSB7779
0447_DSB8360
0421_DSA5009
0394_DSB8244
12/15/17, Lancaster, Lancaster Country Day School, Basketball  ...
12/15/17, Lancaster, Lancaster Country Day School, Basketball  ...
12/15/17, Lancaster, Lancaster Country Day School, Basketball  ...
12/15/17, Lancaster, Lancaster Country Day School, Basketball  ...
12/15/17, Lancaster, Lancaster Country Day School, Basketball  ...
0765_DSB8913
0924_DSB9131
0906_DSA5611
0885_DSB9081
12/15/17, Lancaster, Lancaster Country Day School, Basketball  ...
12/15/17, Lancaster, Lancaster Country Day School, Basketball  ...
12/15/17, Lancaster, Lancaster Country Day School, Basketball  ...
12/15/17, Lancaster, Lancaster Country Day School, Basketball  ...
12/15/17, Lancaster, Lancaster Country Day School, Basketball  ...
12/15/17, Lancaster, Lancaster Country Day School, Basketball  ...
Advertising Photography for F&M College's Athletic Deptartment.
1/24/18, Lancaster, Lancaster Country Day,  ...
Advertising Photography for F&M College's Athletic Deptartment.
Advertising Photography for F&M College's Athletic Deptartment.
Advertising Photography for F&M College's Athletic Deptartment.
Advertising Photography for F&M College's Athletic Deptartment.
1/24/18, Lancaster, Lancaster Country Day,  ...
1/24/18, Lancaster, Lancaster Country Day,  ...
1/24/18, Lancaster, Lancaster Country Day,  ...
1/24/18, Lancaster, Lancaster Country Day,  ...
1/24/18, Lancaster, Lancaster Country Day,  ...
1/24/18, Lancaster, Lancaster Country Day,  ...

Enduring and Prevailing

Maria Toorpakai Wazir, among the world’s best squash players, visited Country Day on Tuesday. The human rights activist and author has spent more than a third of her life in some form of hiding. The first thing she hid was her gender, masquerading as a boy so she could play squash against the boys rather than being confined to her home as other girls were in the Wazir tribe. Later she would hide for her life, receiving death threats from the Taliban in reaction to her rise to the top of international squash and her embrace of multiculturalism.

Toorpakai never doubted the sincerity of the terrorist group’s threat, and she stayed safe by staying at home.

For three straight years, behind locked doors.

She continued to play squash for hours each day, against the first opponent who was as tireless as Toorpakai was: her bedroom wall.

Years of fighting American and Afghan troops took a toll on the Taliban, weakening them enough for Toorpakai to venture outside. Within months of that first step back into the world, she finished third in the world junior women’s squash championship.

Toorpakai success continued at the junior level, and two years after her strong showing in the world championships, she turned pro.

Toorpakai still plays professional squash, but she has also combined her passion for the sport with her unique life story to become something more than a pro athlete.

During her day at LCDS, Toorpakai spent twice as much time talking to Middle and Upper School students as she did playing squash on the new courts. What makes her compelling is that she speaks with more than just the indomitable will and laser focus one would expect from a competitor of her caliber. Toorpakai’s keen intelligence and resilient character allowed her to overcome numerous difficulties, any one of which could reasonably have stymied someone slightly less driven.

She shared stories of enduring ceaseless bullying and harassment from the boys, who were apparently allowed to carry on that way with impunity.

The havoc and destruction of war became another daily occurrence, and Toorpakai described how Taliban bombs leveled her mother’s school, her father’s university, and killed many family friends and neighbors. Toorpakai’s student audience sat rapt while she recounted the terrifying, nightmarish period in a matter-of-fact voice.

One topic that did bring fresh anger to Toorpakai’s story was the Taliban’s interpretation of Islam. A devout Muslim, Toorpakai could barely conceal her disgust for the puritanical, benighted dogma that the Taliban regards as the word of God. It bothered her that they presume to call their ignorant interpretation Islam. What bothered her more, however, was that the beliefs espoused by this tiny group conforms neatly to — and confirms — the simplistic caricature of Islam that’s an essential element of Western prejudice and misunderstanding.

Toorpakai recently published her first book, “A Different Kind of Daughter,” and was chosen to become a member of the International Olympic Committee. In addition, Pope Francis tapped Toorpakai to join his new organization, Sport At The Service Of Humanity. Its mission is to explore “the power for good that [faith and sport] could deliver in partnership with one another.”

For as rich as her life story is, and for as compelling and inspirational it might have struck many in the audience, the highlight of Toorpakai’s day — not to mention every Country Day squash player — came when she stepped onto the court.

For more than two hours, Toorpakai took turns rallying with the large, revolving group of students who packed the spectator area waiting for their turn to hit around with the best player any of them had ever hit around with.

Toorpakai was all smiles and it was hard to tell whether it was she or the kids enjoying the casual squash-stravaganza the most. More than a few times, Toorpakai stopped play to provide pointers on technique or to talk strategy.

It was a vivid example of a truth she had shared with the Middle School a few hours earlier.

“We’re all from the same planet and squash is a universal language,” Toorpakai said.