LCDS 2020-21 Winter Sports Omnibus

By Athletic Director Zac Kraft

With only one starter returning from last year’s L-L League Section 5 and District 3 Class A Champion squad, the girls’ basketball team entered the 2020-21 campaign in rebuilding mode. As if replacing five seniors and 3,000+ points was not enough of a challenge, there was the uncertainty created by COVID. From the state-mandated three week shutdown after only four team practices, to wearing masks at all times, to spectator limitations, the Cougars faced a daunting task on many fronts.

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Led by versatile point guard Genesis Meadows ’23 (18.7 ppg) and team leader Alison Ngau ’21, the Cougars finished the season with an overall record of 7-10, 2-8 in League play, and qualified for the PIAA District 3 Class AA Tournament for the sixth consecutive year, losing to eventual champion Linden Hall in the semifinals. Coaches and players embraced adversity, developed tremendous team chemistry, and bonded together to create a season of significance that truly transcended wins and losses.

Lancaster Lebanon League Awards
L-L League Section 5 1st Team All-Star: Genesis Meadows ’23
L-L League Section 5 Defensive All-Star: Genesis Meadows ’23
L-L League Section 5 Academic All-Star: Alison Ngau ’21

Team Awards
Most Valuable Player: Genesis Meadows ’23
Defensive Player Award: Piper Graham ’22
Most Improved Player: Madison Feddock ’22
Cougar Award: Alison Ngau ’21
Coaches Award: Kiana Wakefield ’22

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The Boys’ Basketball team entered the 2020-21 season with high hopes of redemption after a disappointing season last year. With the start delayed a few weeks, the Cougars finally hit their stride midway through the season and won five out of their last six regular season games to finish 10-6, 4-4 in League play, and qualify for the PIAA District 3 Class A Tournament as the #6 seed. After a bye in the opening round, the Cougars lost in the quarterfinals to High Point Baptist 57-52, ending the season with an overall record of 10-7.

Grant Landis ’22 (16.8), Lance Lennon ’21 (11.9) and Luke Forman ’21 (10.5) led the team offensively. Forman (10.8 rebounds per game) anchored a strong defense that held opponents to 49.5 points per game.

Lancaster Lebanon League Awards
L-L League Section 5 1st Team All-Star: Grant Landis ’22
L-L League Section 5 Defensive All-Star: Luke Forman ’21, Lance Lennon ’21

Team Awards
Most Valuable Player: Luke Forman ’21
Top Offensive Player: Grant Landis ’22
Top Defensive Player: Grant Gilbert ’22
Hustle Award: Christian Hoin ’23
Coaches Award: Lance Lennon ’21

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The JPM Girls’ Swimming team finished the season with an overall record of 2-4, 1-4 in L-L League Section 1. At the L-L League Swimming Championships, the team of Riley Kraft ’22, Alexa Alhadeff ’22, Amelia Woodard ’24 and Corinne De Syon earned two medals, placing eighth in both the 200 Medley Relay (2:03.47) and 200 Free Relay (1:51.95).

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JPM Winter Track & Field — Because of COVID, the team did not officially participate in any indoor meets.

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The 2020-21 Squash season consisted of after-school and weekend training sessions and practices. Coach Proffitt did organize an in-house box league, but the teams did not compete interscholastically versus other schools. The coaching staff awarded the following honors:

Upper School
Rookie of the Year: Delanie Edwards ’24
Coaches Award: Andrew Sigmund ’22
Most Improved: Christopher Riebel ’23

Middle School
Rookie of the Year: Riley Reeser ’27
Coaches Award: Olivia Fantazzi ’26
Most Improved: Andrew Scheid ’27
Spirit Award: Jonathan Ni ’25

Rising To The Poetry Challenge and Triumphing Out Loud

Senior Lily Nguyen won the regional Poetry Out Loud competition last month, and now moves on to the state level, with the chance to win a cash prize and compete nationally. In Middle School poetry news, Meghan Kenney’s seventh graders answered a prompt from NPR: “Honor MLK By Describing How You Dream A World.” Each student wrote their own poem, then chose their favorite line to contribute to the collective class poem based on Langston Hughes “I Dream A World.” Lily’s winning submissions are below, followed by the seventh graders’ work.

“Abandoned Farmhouse,” by Ted Kooser

 


“An Anthology Of Rain,” by Phillis Levin

 


“Tall Ambrosia,” by Henry David Thoreau

 


Collaborative class poems inspired by Langston Hughes’ “I Dream A World”

By English 7 (1)

“Change”

I dream a world where peace, love and progress guide us, not hatred and heteronormativity.
A world where perfect isn’t what other people judge you for, but what you see in yourself.
I dream a world where everyone feels loved.
With this love there will be no one that feels alone, and people can love who they want.
I dream a world where subjects are optional.
A world where people are people in the eyes of businesses, and not just machines made to do their bidding.
I dream a world where everyone has a voice, and where voices are heard.
Where the streets will be filled with seas of colors: red, brown, yellow, white, black all entwined and linking in a powerful tide of unique beauty.
A world where anyone can walk the streets and not be ridiculed for what they look like.
I dream a world where no one has to sleep in the cold, and where there’s no need for worry.
I dream a world where there is no COVID-19.
I dream a world of a long happy life.
If planes can soar then we can too; we are all in this together.

By English 7 (7)

“The Way I Dream This World Of Mine”

The world I dream isn’t far, we can make it happen if we start working hard.
I dream a world where there is no hate just because of different races or beliefs,
A world where life is free.
I dream a world where there is no conflict
Or violence.
A world where all will feel safe.
I dream a world that is a healthy place for people to live in.
The world that I dream, gleams and money grows on trees.
Nations apart, but somehow combined, is the way I dream of mine.

By English 7 (6)

“This World I Dream”

I dream a world, this world I dream is equal for all and for all it is free.
A world where men and women are treated the same
A world full respect and equality
Where freedom knows no borders
And we come together and celebrate differences and individuality.

I dream a world where everyone sees the sun,
Everyone smiles and laughs,
And always has fun.

I dream a world where violence
Will not touch earth’s petals
Where we do not destroy the planet but care for it
A world with clean air and water all over it.
A world with no immediate conflict
Where no animal shall suffer
And everyone looks out for one another.
A world filled with green and no corruption
With police who can properly function
Where peace and love are all around and there is harmony.
I dream of a world free from war and injustice
A world where there is kindness and we see through our blindness.

I dream a world full of these things;
But the way the world has become,
I feel I can only just dream.

LCDS Theater Presents A Historic Double Feature

“My thoughts were this,” Kristin Wolanin said. “We need theater this fall, and life in general has already been dark enough; I don’t want the theater to be dark too.”

Then, having thought those things, the director of Country Day theater turned her attention toward making them happen. Twice. In a format neither the cast, crew, or director had ever attempted before.

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“The kids came back thinking we’re not going to have a show and my reaction was, ‘What do you mean? It’s Wolanin. Of course we’re going to have a show,’” Wolanin said. “Also, I have an addiction. Not doing a show wasn’t a possibility for me.”

Of course, doing only one show was a possibility. Then Wolanin thought some more.

“I had this fantastic all-female cast and two plays that I loved that I knew could be chopped down into great one-act shows. So that’s what we’re doing, and it’s been extra double crazy!”

Everyone is invited to watch The LCDS Theatre Company keep the performing arts thriving in two groundbreaking productions, “Steel Magnolias” and “The House Of Bernarda Alba.” Showtimes for “Steel Magnolias” are 7 p.m. Friday, Nov. 6 and Saturday, Nov. 14, with the curtain rising on “The House Of Bernarda Alba” at 7 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 7 and Friday, Nov. 13.

The shows are free, but if you would like to support the Company with a donation, you can do so here, with sincere thanks from the cast and crew.

Instead of a live performance, each show is its own film of a staged reading, in full costume, as an ensemble. The filming consisted of two four-hour shoots that were then edited to move the players in their Zoom cubes around the screen to approximate the feeling of seeing actors move around the stage.

“It can be hard to picture,” Wolanin said, “but a good way to think about it is as a radio drama rather than a traditional play.”

Both shows have the advantage of taking place in one location, both center on the “awesome, juicy drama of all these women,” and both feature six members of the eight-actress cast playing strikingly different roles in each play.

“To play two characters basically at the same time who come from different countries and different cultures and speak completely differently than the other, that’s not easy to do,” Wolanin said. “I was really impressed with how much range and versatility they showed.”

To watch the shows, you first have to register by clicking the links below. Once registered, you will receive an email that will tell you how to join the audience.


“Steel Magnolias”

7 p.m. Friday, Nov. 7 — Click here
7 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 14 — Click here

“The House of Bernarda Alba”

7 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 7 — Click here
7 p.m. Friday, Nov. 13 — Click here

Cast:

“Steel Magnolias”

Truvy — Hannah Whisman
Annelle — Laurel Marx
Clairee — Sophie McDougall
Shelby — Mae Barr
M’Lynn — Amelia Lojewski
Ouiser — Frannie Thiry

“The House of Bernarda Alba”

Angustias — Mae Barr
Martirio — Amelia Lojewski
Magdelena — Laurel Marx
Amelia — Peachy Lee
Poncia — Frannie Thiry
Adela — Sophie McDougall
Bernarda — Hannah Whisman
Servant — Sarah Hilton

Crew:

Stage Manager — Sarah Hilton
Costumes — Riley Eckman*, Keira Alhadeff, and Anna Sponaugle
Props — Linnea Winterer*, Ruby Nemeroff, Kobe West, Lennon Krista, and Jayden Temple
Sound — Ben Kendall, Grace Foresman*, and Eli Hurtt
Publicity — Ben Kendall*, Olivia Neff, and Linnea Wright
* — Crew Chief